Easy All Natural Antibacterial Cream

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Neosporin is the go-to for scrapes, cuts, and so much more.   It’s the trusted ointment found in any well-equipped first-aid kits, and it’s recommended by its manufacturer Johnson & Johnson as the “#1 Dr. Recommended Brand.” Neosporin has its uses but for someone with a healthy immune system it’s really not required to dab it on every scrape. If you have a weakened immune system then it’s of course better to take any step possible to keep yourself from getting sick.

The Dangers of Neosporin

Neosporin and other antibacterial ointments may be one of the factors behind the spread of an especially lethal strain of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), called USA300, according to a study published in Emerging Infectious Diseases.MRSA bacteria spread through skin-to-skin contact and often strike people who are prone to cuts and scrapes, like children and athletes. (Though its name indicates its resistance to methicillin, MRSA is also resistant to common antibiotics like penicillin and amoxicillin.)

Researchers found that nearly half of the USA300 samples they studied grew unhampered by two of the antibiotics found in both Polysporin and Neosporin (bacitracin and neomycin), indicating that they were resistant to both drugs. Another USA300 sample was resistant to bacitracin, but susceptible to neomycin.

Triple antibiotic ointment is rarely used outside America, and resistance to bacitracin and neomycin was only found in USA300, a type of MRSA found in the United States. Johnson & Johnson, which garnered $28.1 billion in worldwide sales in 2013, claims that the study doesn’t prove a link between the ointments and MRSA resistance to antibiotics.

When you apply Neosporin on a cut, you might be doing more than just speeding up the healing process—you could be exposing yourself to harmful chemicals.

The petrolatum found in the most common antibacterial ointments may be contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are classified as possible carcinogens in Europe.

Want to try a safer alternative? Here’s how to heal wounds with all-natural, soothing ingredients known for their antimicrobial powers.

Ingredients

1/2 cup coconut oil
4 tablespoons beeswax
1 tablespoon witch hazel
10 drops lavender essential oil
15 drops tea tree oil

Instructions

Melt coconut oil and beeswax over a double boiler. Transfer to a blender and add witch hazel, lavender oil, and tea tree oil. Blend 30 seconds.

Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.

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Of course, I am inviting you to please take a moment and educate your self and never take one person’s word for granted.

I want to thank you  for reading my latest blog.  Please let me know if you need any support with it. 

Otherwise, are we friends on Facebook yet?  If not let’s do that now, healing Hypothyroidism.   I like to connect on a more personal level there and often; offer social media only products that can only be accessed on my page and share daily updates along with recipes. Remember sharing is caring. Please share and post a comment to this blog! I would love to hear from you. Sign up for my blogs @ thehypothyroidismchick.com .  You can also  Follow me on instagram @ Thyroidismchick or Follow me on twitter @Thyroidismchick.

Health and Happiness,

Audrey
XoXo
Audrey Childers is a published author, blogger, freelance journalist and an entrepreneur with over a decade of experience in research and editorial writing. She is also the creator and founder of the website the hypothyroidismchick.com. Where you can find great tips on everyday living with hypothyroidism. She enjoys raising her children and being a voice for optimal human health and wellness. She is the published author of : A survivors cookbook guide to kicking hypothyroidism booty, Reset your Thyroid, The Ultimate guide to healing hypothyroidism and  A survivors cookbook guide to kicking hypothyroidism booty: the slow cooker way. You can find all these books on Amazon.  You can also find her actively involved in her Facebook Group : Healing Hypothyroidism. This blog may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.

Disclaimer

The information and recipes contained in blog is based upon the research and the personal experiences of the author. It’s for entertainment purposes only. Every attempt has been made to provide accurate, up to date and reliable information. No warranties of any kind are expressed or implied. Readers acknowledge that the author is not engaging in the rendering of legal, financial, medical or professional advice. By reading this blog, the reader agrees that under no circumstance the author is not responsible for any loss, direct or indirect, which are incurred by using this information contained within this blog. Including but not limited to errors, omissions or inaccuracies. This blog is not intended as replacements from what your health care provider has suggested.  The author is not responsible for any adverse effects or consequences resulting from the use of any of the suggestions, preparations or procedures discussed in this blog. All matters pertaining to your health should be supervised by a health care professional. I am not a doctor, or a medical professional. This blog is designed for as an educational and entertainment tool only. Please always check with your health practitioner before taking any vitamins, supplements, or herbs, as they may have side-effects, especially when combined with medications, alcohol, or other vitamins or supplements.  Knowledge is power, educate yourself and find the answer to your health care needs. Wisdom is a wonderful thing to seek.  I hope this blog will teach and encourage you to take leaps in your life to educate yourself for a happier & healthier life. You have to take ownership of your health.

 

References:

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